Canyon News

Canyon News Letter Fall 2014 October 22, 2014 4:15 am

 

inthecanyon SIZZLES WITH CULINARY TALENT:

 

We enjoy an abundance of fine dining inthcanyon.  Whether your taste runs from nachos and a cold Corona to an elegant fresh caught fish dinner we have it all.

But, even more than that, our neighborhoods are home to a number of award-worthy chefs and culinary entrepreneurs.

Josh Loeb and Zoe Nathan are pretty much superstars in the restaurant world. The husband and wife team not only own and run Rustic Canyon Wine Bar but also Huckleberry Bakery & Café, Milo & Olive and Sweet Rose Creamery.  Their food philosophy is organic, fresh, local and always cook and bake in

keeping with the season. You can be sure to see them at the Santa Monica and Pacific Palisades farmers markets on any given week. We can’t wait to see what new tasty adventure they come up with next.

Uplifters Kitchen on Ocean Park is a small coffee shop and bakery with a strong emphasis on locally sourced ingredients. Owners and inthecanyon residents Elizabeth Spaulding and Tara Amiel bake all their goodies in house and in small batches and partner with other Los Angeles based artisanal food companies to bring you the highest caliber of product in the market.

Kim Jacobs dreamed of creating an opportunity for people to come “commune and connect spontaneously without having to get in your car or to plan it.” So, she and her husband Alain Briere decided to bring the experience to people.  Their vintage RustiCoffee aluminum trailer has become a mainstay inthecanyon and surrounding communities.  Featuring Stumptown Roasters coffee they park the trailer, open the side panel and treat the neighbors to great coffee, baked goods and a chance to “commune and connect” for a while.  RustiCoffee is very active in participating in fundraising events.

How does Kim feel about living inthecanyon?  She calls it a “beautiful tight-knit neighborhood.”

 

SAVING WATER:

News flash….. It’s a drought and water is in pretty short supply.  We haven’t really felt the effects of diminishing water yet; no rationing, no dust coming out of the faucet when you turn it on to get a cool glass of water, so a lot of people are just doing what they have always done.

However, all indications are that this Super Drought is the real thing and we can do so little to save so much.

Here are some simple things that we all can do to do our parts.

Indoors: 

Wash only full loads of laundry and dishes – Saves up to 50 gallons per week.   

Fix household leaks promptly – Saves up to 20 gallons per day 

Spend only 5 minutes in the shower – Saves thousands of gallons per year. 

Turn off the water while you brush your teeth – Saves up to 2.5 gallons per minute 

Buy water-saving devices like high-efficiency toilets and clothes washers – Saves many gallons per day.

Outdoors:

Water your lawn 1 to 2 days a week instead of 5 – Saves up to 840 gallons per week.

Check sprinkler systems for leaks, overspray and broken sprinkler heads and fix immediately – Saves up to 500 gallons per month.

Use a broom instead of a hose to clean driveways and sidewalks – Saves up to 150 gallons each time

 Install a smart sprinkler controller that adjusts watering based on weather, soil type, amount of shade and plant type – Savings up to 40 gallons per day.

Water your plants in the early morning or evening to reduce evaporation and ineffective watering due to wind – Saves up to 25 gallons each time. 

Use organic mulch around plants to reduce evaporation – Hundreds of gallons per year

Consider re-doing your lawn with drought tolerant plants, gravel pathways, etc. – Hundreds of gallons per year. There is a program wherein the state will actually PAY you to convert your water guzzling lawn into a beautiful drought tolerant landscape.

Turf Terminators will do your eco-friendly landscaping in exchange for the state rebate. Check it out at

turfterminators.com

 

THINK LIKE AN ONION:
It’s an unfortunate fact of life, but there are some people out in the world who want our things before we are ready to let go of them. It’s something we all have to be aware of and, when thinking about making our homes safe, it’s a good idea to “think onion”. In other words, rather than putting up one barrier to protect your belongings, do it in layers. The more barriers a potential thief has to go through, the less likely you will be a victim – they will move on to an easier, more hassle-free target. This can be done fairly easily and with little expense. First, walk around your house and think like a burglar – looking for the easiest way to break in. Then, set up your defenses. For example, plant rosebushes outside windows. It not only will add a little beauty to the house, those thorns become a thief’s worse nightmare trying to crawl over to get into a window. Get double locks for the doors, at least one being a deadbolt. The longer it takes trying to get in the more exposed the intruder is and more likely to be discovered. Be sure garage doors and doors connecting the garage to the house are locked. Sounds obvious yet, it is one of the most common ways intruders get in and get your stuff out undetected; they just drive in, close the garage door behind them and load up! Also, don’t tempt fate by having your expensive electronics, artwork or other valuables visible to the world. And last, probably your greatest defense is being a good neighbor and friend. If everyone looked out for everyone else, the word quickly gets out “Not in my neighborhood”.  Your area LAPD Senior Lead Offer, Michael Moore, at (310) 444-0737 is there to help if you should need him.

 

EMPTY NESTER?

When our children begin to leave home as they start their new lives, many homeowners look to downsize their homes.  If you are 55 or older there are two laws that will help you save money when buying your new house; Propositions 60 & 90.

Proposition 60 allows  home sellers  who are at least 55 years old to transfer their  tax base from your existing home to your new purchase if the existing home is sold first and the new home is purchased within 2 years in the same county.  The one caveat is that the old home must have sold for at least the same price as the new home.  And, a five percent inflation allowance is allowed if the subsequent purchase is less than one year of the sale date of the original place of residence. A ten percent inflation allowance is allowed if purchased between one year, one day and up to two years.

Proposition 90 further expands this program to transfers between counties if the county supervisors have approved it.

As always, be sure to check with your tax accountant or attorney.